Tag Archives: Pirro Ligorio

Who’s afraid of Monsters? Il Sacro Bosco

b17Il Sacro Bosco
The Monster Park
Località Giardino
01020 Bomarzo (VT)
Tel: 0761-924-029

Our granddaughters are too worldly to be afraid of monsters – they take more delight in poking fun at what we old folks might call scary. The Monster Park of Bomarzo, known as the Sacro Bosco or Sacred Grove, we discover, is delightful. Located in Bomarzo in the province of Viterbo, north of Rome, this 16th century garden is anything but frightful, but it is awesome. Designed by architect Pirro Ligorio in the Mannerist style of European art that emerged around 1520 in Italy, the garden is best described as surreal.

Dispersed among the dense woods and vegetation in the valley below Castle Orsini, larger-than-life grotesque sculptures of mystical figures and animals inhabit the space, some of them sculpted right into the bedrock. In a once barren landscape, the garden was commissioned by Pier Francesco Orsini as a means of expressing his grief at the loss of his wife, as indicated by an inscription that explains this intention: sol per sfogare il Core – just to set the heart free. It is hard to connect the individual works into any organized plan, or fully understand their symbolism; the statues or buildings rather seem intended to astonish us, by their size, or subject, or by their unexpected appearance as we round a corner. There is even an purposely constructed leaning house, intended to disorient the visitor. Giants, monstrous fish, a war elephant, and the iconic monumental monster face all play their part in this bizarre wonderland.

Over the course of the centuries, the park fell into neglect and the garden became overgrown with vegetation. In the 1950s, the Bettini family began a restoration program that lasted twenty years, and today, although still private property, it is open to the public – to amaze, to delight, but definitely not to frighten. Even the giant screaming mouth welcomes you inside, perhaps to picnic, if you so wish.

The park is open all year long from 8.00 a.m. until sunset .

Entrance fees :
Individual 10,00 Euro
Children from 4 to 13 years 8,00 Euro
Groups minimum 30 people 8,00 Euro (with the letter of the promoting Organization)
Student 6,00 Euro (with the letter of school) and one free entrance for every 15 people

copyright Ginda Simpson – http://www.rooms-withaivew.comhttp://www.gindasimpson.com

 

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Villa d’Este – a garden that stuns and soothes

Villa d'Este (4)

Villa d’Este
Piazza Trento, 5
00019 Tivoli (Rome)
Tel: 39-041-271-9036
http://www.villadestetivoli.info
villadestetivoli@bestunion.com

A UNESCO World Heritage Site,  belonging to the Italian State that oversees its restorations and maintenance, Villa d’Este and its gardens were built by Cardinal Ippolito d’Este in the early 16th century.  Designed by architect Pirro Ligorio and realized by Alberto Galvani, the villa and gardens are located in Tivoli, outside of Rome.

For me, a walk through the garden is always perfumed with nostalgia, a longing to go back. In my case, it would mean going back more than fifty years, when I was first introduced to the gardens by my father. Actually, it was not without the loving companionship and assistance of my mother that we made these trips with my eleven siblings in tow. But it was my father who had a way of making me feel as if he had brought me alone to see the beauty that he so deeply appreciated. He made it a place of joyful learning.

He would patiently explain its wonders and I would be ensnared in that magical net. Where else in the world can one see such an extraordinary system of fountains, fifty-one to be exact, with a profusion of spouts, waterfalls, grottoes, basins and channels, all in a liquid dance that worked entirely without pumps, dependent on gravity alone? The water is supplied by the Aniene, a 62 mile-long river that flows westward before it joins the Tiber in Rome.

Villa d'Este (8)

Villa d'Este (1)A long panoramic terrace leads us from the villa and its loggia to the upper levels of the estate and then what is known as the Cardinal’s Walk, a shaded path, takes us from one end of the garden to the other. I could not possibly list the marvels of the illustrious fountains that make this Italian Renaissance garden so famous. And so, I will revisit some of my favorites. I can see my little brothers propelled ahead of us to be the first to discover the next new treasure or to distance themselves enough to get into some watery mischief. We older children are lagging behind them, intrigued by the Hundred Fountains. Constructed between 1566 and 1577, the fountains have close to 300 spouts fed by three levels of canals running side by side, each sending its water to the canal below. Many of the original sculptures that adorned the walls along these channels have deteriorated or disappeared altogether, leaving their replacements and the walls covered in vegetation and a velvety moss.

Oval Fountain

My younger siblings have beat us to the Fontana dell’Ovato, one of the first and most famous of the garden. I recall vividly the thrill of walking beneath the cascade of the Grotto of Venus, both wishing for and dreading a gust of wind that would have us all soaked through. I imagine the Cardinal’s guests, who used this space on hot summer days felt the same way. The original statues of the grotto are now in the Capitoline Museum, and visitors are currently not allowed to walk beneath the cascade.

Villa d'Este (5)Villa d'Este (3)

Surpassing the enchantment of the Fontana dell’Ovato is the spectacular Fountain of Neptune with water jets reaching over 40 feet into the air, flanked by other jets and multiple cascades. It commands a view of the three massive rectangular fish ponds which originally served to provide fresh fish and ducks for the Cardinal’s table. Designed to connect the Fountain of the Organ and the Fountain of the Seas, they offer perhaps the most temptation to small visitors to get splashing.  Is that my little brother leaning over the edge, water up to his armpits, in an attempt to catch a fish?

Villa d'Este (7)One of the sculptures removed from the Organ Fountain is the Statue of Diana of Ephesus, now placed at the end of the garden. Even though it appears ancient, it was made in 1568 by a Flemish sculptor, who was inspired by the ancient statuary found in other Roman villas. Known also as the Fountain of Mother Nature, it has jets of water spurting from each of her many breasts, so my father explained, to represent fertility. Now, fertility is something we understand as members of a large family, but it made us giggle nonetheless. We may have even counted to make sure there were twelve breasts!

Over the decades since my first introduction to the Villa d’Este, I have enjoyed the gardens over and over again. The artist in me is always revitalized by the many fountains that delight the eye and sooth the spirit. It is not without gratitude that I think of the Cardinal, the architect and landscape artist, the sculptors, engineers, gardeners and grounds-keepers who have made this experience possible. And thank you, Dad, for the memories.

Villa d'Este (2)

Full ticket: € 8,00
Reduced ticket: € 4,00

Guided Tours:
Guided tours of the garden and villa are available.
Prices:
Guided tour in the Italian Language (max. 25 persons): € 90. Each additional person please add € 3,50 to a maximum of 50 persons.
Guided tour in other languages (English, French, German, Spanish) (maximum 25 persons) € 110. Each additional person please add € 3,50 to a maximum of 50 persons.

copyright Ginda Simpson – http://www.rooms-withaview.comhttp://www.gindasimpson.com